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Several years ago on my birthday, my daughter told me she wanted to take me on a tool shopping trip worth $100. My first reaction was that of most parents which was to save her money since she is paying her own way through college. But she insisted and being a gearhead there is always another tool that I can find that is usefull…my 24 different hammers is a perfect example. The one area of my tool set that has always been scarce is extensions for my ratchets and socket wrenches.

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With that in mind I focused on picking out several 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2 extensions including two very long ones (the 3/8 one is shown in the picture). Of course my daughter went along on the shopping trip to the our local hardware store to pay for the tools and my wife came along no doubt for the entainment I would provide. Needless to say I think both of them thought I was a little off my rocker with my unexpected choice of tools…a fist full of extensions.

After work this past Friday, my daughter informed me her check engine light was on. She assured me she had just recently checked all the fluid levels (I think I have finally succeeded in training her that when she buys gas, check the oil level and other fluids). Having just spent a small fortune a year ago on her car (new timing belt, water pump and radiator) she was worried that her car was going to cost another arm and leg to fix. To make sure she would get a good nights sleep, I suggested we go and see what was causing the problem. While she entertained herself double checking the fluid levels, I attached my code reader to her car’s OBD II port. It came back and told us her power steering pressure sensor was not functioning. On Saturday afternoon my daughter was able to purchase a new sensor at Monument Auto Parts. Sunday evening, after getting her car up on the ramps to locate the failed part, my daughter suddenly realized why I had chossen these really long extensions and was thankful they were in my tool chest. The offending sensor was on the back side of the steering rack buried deep behind a cross member. In the end, with her favorite dad’s help, the repair to her car cost just shy of $40 and was only about an hour of our time.